Antarctica’s ice is shrinking at an unprecedented rate that could imperil coastal regions worldwide

The Antarctic ice sheet lost nearly 3 trillion metric tons of ice from 1992 to 2017, and its rate of loss over that time tripled in West Antarctica, according to an international collaboration involving about 80 scientists.

The finding, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, reveals that the continent’s ice is shrinking at an unprecedented rate and could mean an even higher sea level rise by 2100. That would have serious implications for the environment and for people living in coastal regions around the world.

“People should be concerned that Antarctica is clearly feeling the effects of climate change and it’s responding to changes in ocean temperature,” said lead author Andrew Shepherd, a glaciologist at the University of Leeds in England.

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